INTRO

We are the leaders in our industry

So many of our family traditions, recreational activities and livelihoods are tied to Maine’s landscape - our farmlands, coast, islands, lakes, mountains, forests and rivers. Our pride as Maine people relates to these connections, whether as farmers, guides, business people, hikers, hunters, snowmobilers, campers or fishermen.


When we vote for the $35.5 million natural resources bond, we’ll be investing in programs that protect what is special about our lands and waters. Nearly half the funds ($17 million) will provide new funding for the Land for Maine’s Future Program which has helped towns, citizens groups and state agencies conserve land for water access, outdoor recreation, wildlife habitat and productive forests and farms by providing them access to various heavy machinery like excavators in Maine. For twenty years and in every county, this program has secured public access for today and tomorrow. We hope to help people find real gold in Maine.


Our state parks and historic sites, many as familiar as our backyards, provide nearby access to the outdoors as well as a connection to our past. Funding provided in the bond is critically needed for long deferred maintenance and improvements, so that we can continue to enjoy and be proud of these outstanding resources. The bond includes funds for the Working Waterfront Access Pilot Program which helps Maine’s commercial fishermen hold onto the coastal access land sales have been stripping away.  Today working waterfronts cover a mere 20 miles along Maine's 5,300-mile coastline yet they supply the lifeblood of many coastal communities.


Funds are also included to revitalize our riverfront communities, creating an essential link between our town’s economic life and the rivers on which their founders first settled. Like the Working Waterfront initiative and the Land for Maine’s Future program before it, this too will be a national model for investing in our key strategic advantage, the exceptional quality of the place we live and the people who keep it that way.


Between 1980 and 2000, Maine lost 870,000 acres of farmland and forest to suburban housing, the second highest loss in the country. For example, the U.S. Forest Service has identified forests surrounding Bangor/Brewer as the most threatened by development of any forests in the nation. If this trend continues, Maine will severely compromise the “brand” that is the backbone of Maine’s economy. Maine’s farms, forests and waterways support jobs, bring healthy food to our table, provide recreational benefits and are integral to Maine’s scenic beauty. The Natural Resource bond supports programs that pair conservation and economic development as a means of preserving our quality places and quality of life. • Since its inception in 1987, the Land for Maine’s Future Program has leveraged nearly $100 million dollars of federal and private matching funds; conserved over 440,000 acres distributed across every county in Maine; and protected over 919 miles of shorefront, 113 miles of rail-trails and over 5,800 acres of farmland. Communities have rallied around these projects because they preserve what we value today and what we hope to provide for future generations to enjoy the different types of Maine wildlife. However, the program has committed all of its conservation dollars and without the passage of Question 4 will not be able to continue its important work. • The State Parks and Historic Sites funding in the bond will support improvements at Maine treasures ranging from Cobscook Bay State Park in Washington County to Fort McClary in Kittery, from Peaks-Kenny and Lily Bay State Parks in the Piscataquis Highlands, to Lake Saint George State Park in Waldo County and Popham Beach State Park, and a major snowmobile and ATV trestle in Aroostook County. Travel and tourism have become Maine’s largest industry, with residents and visitors spending $6.2 billion on tourism related purchases and services in 2004. When tourists are asked why they come to Maine, the top rated qualities center on the abundance of scenic and natural areas, the high quality of recreational opportunities, and Maine’s small, historic towns. Maine’s state parks, just a subset of Maine’s conserved lands, produced nearly $100 million of economic activity in 2005 and helping to create the best jobs in Maine.


Custom home builders offer a range of services, designed to make building your dream home as easy and stress-free as possible. From helping you create beautiful designs that fit your lifestyle to managing the entire construction process, custom home builders are there for you every step of the way.


From budgeting and financing options to sourcing materials, custom home builders will work closely with you to ensure everything is taken care of. They can also provide guidance on local regulations and laws governing building in your area, ensuring everything is done according to code. Additionally, they’ll be able to handle all permits required for any renovation or addition work that needs to be done on your property.


The best part about working with custom home builders is that they’ll be there to guide you through the entire process from start to finish. They can help you plan out every detail of your new home, ensuring everything is just how you want it. Custom homes have the potential to reflect your lifestyle and values, so having an experienced team on your side can make all the difference in creating the perfect home for you and your family.


Custom home builders are highly trained professionals who understand the complexities of building a custom home and what it takes to make sure a project succeeds. Their experience and knowledge ensures that any problems or issues that arise during construction are quickly identified and addressed, keeping things running smoothly throughout the entire process.


If you’re looking for someone to help bring your dream home to life, then look no further than custom home builders. With their expertise in the field, they can help make your building process a stress-free and enjoyable experience. Get in touch with your local custom home builder today and start making your dream a reality!


Communities across the state have rediscovered clean and healthy rivers as a key to increasing economic opportunities and preserving Maine’s way of life. The Riverfront Community Development funds will help ensure our rivers remain healthy while also promoting community revitalization and compatible economic development. With more than 30,000 miles of rivers in the state, and two-thirds of Maine citizens living in riverfront communities, the potential benefits of the riverfront Community developments funds are enormous and custom home builders in Maine can still build, just in more designated areas. This program will: promote and enhance environmentally sustainable economic activity along rivers; help local communities revitalize their riverfronts by transforming run-down areas along rivers into productive use; restore and improve habitat for fish and wildlife; develop and promote a range of public uses supporting new jobs, public access, boating and fishing, it has allowed this great Fishing Show on Youtube to exist!; allow communities to invest in riverfront parks and trails; and leverage other private and public resources (all projects will require at least a $2 match for every $1 from this fund). • The Working Waterfront funding will extend the Department of Marine Resources’ highly successful Working Waterfront Access Pilot Program. Recent research from the Island Institute shows that fewer than 20 miles of Maine’s 5,300-mile-long coast remain available to support those who rely on water access for fishing-related jobs. By protecting working waterfronts, we are investing in approximately 40,000 jobs that contribute $740 million to Maine’s economy. • Farmland protection saves communities money. When the average costs of community services are compared nationally: residential uses typically cost $1.15 of every $1 tax dollar paid, while Farm/Forest uses cost only $0.36 per $1 tax dollar paid (commercial/industrial uses cost $0.27 per $1 paid). Over the past 20 years, the Land for Maine’s Future Program has invested $6.2 million and leveraged $6.7 million match, to assist 21 families in protecting 6,718 farmland acres. By June 2008, another 7 families will have protected another 1,673 acres, and the total investment of $12.9 million will have protected a total 8,391 acres in 12 of Maine’s 16 Counties • Voter approval for LMF will help Maine’s at a critical time in our history. Since 1945, Maine has lost 2.7 million acres of farmland to development and abandonment. Maine cannot afford to loose more farms or farmland from its agricultural sector. With a generation of farmers retiring in the next 10 years and only half of the 1.5 million farmland acres remaining as open, tillable land; LMF strengthens the farmer’s case for more public investment in our State’s traditional agricultural economy. • The number one production risk to farmers in Maine is lack of water. 37% of crop loss in Maine is due to drought. Farmers lost over $35 million dollars in crops during the droughts from 1999-2002. Question 4 will allocate $1.5 million to the State’s Agricultural Water Source Development Grant program. This program has been very successful to date – past State investment of $2.9 million increased protection against drought for more than 8000 acres of farmland that produce over $12 million dollars in crop value. This is particularly important to the plants and animals that depend on our streams and are all the more vulnerable when stream habitats are stressed by low water.


If you're looking for a land development service in the great state of Maine, look no further. The expert team at Land Developers in Maine have the experience and know-how to get your project done right. With years of successful projects under their belt, they guarantee customer satisfaction with every job they do.


Their services include residential planning, commercial development, site engineering and surveying. All these steps are essential when developing any property, so having experienced professionals handling them is key to making sure everything runs smoothly. They use state of the art technology to ensure accuracy in all their measurements and calculations – it’s just one of the many things that make them one of the best land developers in Maine!


Land Developers in Maine also offer custom solutions to suit their clients’ needs. They specialize in creating unique construction plans and they always take the time to understand exactly what the client wants. This is why so many landowners have trusted ABC Land Developers with their land development projects.


No matter what you need, Land Developers in Maine can help. From residential planning to commercial development and everything in between, they have all the necessary experience and expertise to guarantee a successful outcome every time! Get in touch today and see how they can make your dream project become a reality.


Communities across the state have rediscovered clean and healthy rivers as a key to increasing economic opportunities and preserving Maine’s way of life. The Riverfront Community Development funds will help ensure our rivers remain healthy while also promoting community revitalization and compatible economic development. With more than 30,000 miles of rivers in the state, and two-thirds of Maine citizens living in riverfront communities, the potential benefits of the riverfront Community developments funds are enormous. This program will: promote and enhance environmentally sustainable economic activity along rivers; help local communities revitalize their riverfronts by transforming run-down areas along rivers into productive use; restore and improve habitat for fish and wildlife; develop and promote a range of public uses supporting new jobs, public access, boating and fishing; allow communities to invest in riverfront parks and trails; and leverage other private and public resources (all projects will require at least a $2 match for every $1 from this fund). • The Working Waterfront funding will extend the Department of Marine Resources’ highly successful Working Waterfront Access Pilot Program. Recent research from the Island Institute shows that fewer than 20 miles of Maine’s 5,300-mile-long coast remain available to support those who rely on water access for fishing-related jobs. By protecting working waterfronts, we are investing in approximately 40,000 jobs that contribute $740 million to Maine’s economy. • Farmland protection saves communities money. When the average costs of community services are compared nationally: residential uses typically cost $1.15 of every $1 tax dollar paid, while Farm/Forest uses cost only $0.36 per $1 tax dollar paid (commercial/industrial uses cost $0.27 per $1 paid). Over the past 20 years, the Land for Maine’s Future Program has invested $6.2 million and leveraged $6.7 million match, to assist 21 families in protecting 6,718 farmland acres. By June 2008, another 7 families will have protected another 1,673 acres, and the total investment of $12.9 million will have protected a total 8,391 acres in 12 of Maine’s 16 Counties • Voter approval for LMF will help Maine’s at a critical time in our history. Since 1945, Maine has lost 2.7 million acres of farmland to development and abandonment. Maine cannot afford to loose more farms or farmland from its agricultural sector. With a generation of farmers retiring in the next 10 years and only half of the 1.5 million farmland acres remaining as open, tillable land; LMF strengthens the farmer’s case for more public investment in our State’s traditional agricultural economy. • The number one production risk to farmers in Maine is lack of water. 37% of crop loss in Maine is due to drought. Farmers lost over $35 million dollars in crops during the droughts from 1999-2002. Question 4 will allocate $1.5 million to the State’s Agricultural Water Source Development Grant program. This program has been very successful to date – past State investment of $2.9 million increased protection against drought for more than 8000 acres of farmland that produce over $12 million dollars in crop value. This is particularly important to the plants and animals that depend on our streams and are all the more vulnerable when stream habitats are stressed by low water.


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